Who Was the First African-american Country Music Star?

Learn about the history of African-american country music and the first African-american country music star.

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Who was the first African-American country music star?

The first African-American country music star was Charley Pride. He was born in Mississippi in 1934 and rose to fame in the 1960s. He became the first black member of the Grand Ole Opry in 1967 and had a number of hits throughout his career, including “Kiss an Angel Good Mornin'” and “Is Anybody Goin’ to San Antone.” Pride continued to perform and record until his death in 2020.

The history of African-American country music

African-American country music is a genre that began in the 1920s with the publication of Fiddlin’ John Carson’s “Little Old Cabin in the Lane” (1920). The first African-American country music star was George Washington Phillips, who recorded “Gwine to Run All Night, or De Camptown Races” in 1910. Country music has been popular among African Americans since its inception, and has been especially popular since the 1970s. Popular African-American country artists include Charley Pride, Mahalia Jackson, and Darius Rucker.

The influence of African-American country music

African-American country music has been around for centuries, but it wasn’t until the early twentieth century that it began to gain mainstream popularity. The first African-American country music star was Ernest Rodgers, who rose to fame in the 1920s. Rodgers was a talented singer and songwriter, and his music helped to bridge the gap between black and white country music fans. He paved the way for other African-American country stars, such as Charley Pride and Loretta Lynn, who would achieve great success in the following decades.

The future of African-American country music

The future of African-American country music is bright. There are a number of talented artists who are making their mark on the genre. One of the most notable is Lil Nas X. He is a rapper and singer who rose to fame with his song “Old Town Road.” The song was so popular that it crossed over into the country genre, and Lil Nas X became the first African-American artist to top the country charts.

The top African-American country music stars

African-American country music stars have been making an impact on the music industry for decades. While there is some debate about who was the first African-American country music star, there is no doubt that these artists have made a lasting impact on the genre.

Some of the top African-American country music stars include:

Charley Pride: ACountry Music Hall of Fame inductee, Charley Pride is best known for hits like “Kiss an Angel Good Mornin'” and “Is Anybody Goin’ to San Antone.”

Loretta Lynn: A multiple Grammy Award winner, Loretta Lynn is one of the best-selling female artists in country music history. She is known for hits like “Coal Miner’s Daughter” and “One’s on the Way.”

Willie Nelson: A legendary figure in country music, Willie Nelson has won multiple Grammy Awards and is one of the best-selling artists of all time. He is known for hits like “On the Road Again” and “Always on My Mind.”

The best African-American country music albums

African-American country music is a genre that has its roots in the United States. While the genre has been around for many years, it has only recently begun to gain mainstream attention.

One of the most popular African-American country music artists is Charley Pride. Pride was born in Mississippi in 1934 and was one of the first African-American country music stars. He released his debut album, The Pride of Country Music, in 1966.

Other popular African-American country music artists include Darius Rucker, Lee Ann Womack, and Jamey Johnson. Rucker is best known for his work as the lead singer of Hootie & the Blowfish. Womack is a Grammy-winning singer-songwriter who has released hits like “I Hope You Dance” and “The Fool.” Johnson is a Grammy-winning country singer whose albums have topped the country charts.

The worst African-American country music albums

In the world of country music, African-Americans have been largely sidelined. In recent years, however, a few artists have begun to break through and gain mainstream success. But for every critically acclaimed album by an African-American country artist, there are countless forgettable ones. Here are ten of the worst African-American country music albums ever made.

1. Willie Nelson and Wyclef Jean – Countryman (2005)

This album was a misguided attempt at fusing country and hip-hop, and it failed miserably. The results were clunky, awkward, and just plain unpleasant to listen to.

2. Dolly Parton – For God and Country (2003)

Parton’s foray into patriotic gospel music was hampered by weak songwriting and unimaginative arrangements. The album was met with lukewarm reviews and quickly faded into obscurity.

3. LeAnn Rimes – Family (2000)

Rimes’ third album saw her veering into the world of contemporary Christian music, but the results were flat and uninspiring. The album flopped commercially and was savaged by critics.

4. Dwight Yoakam – Population: Me (2003)

Yoakam’s first album in four years was a major disappointment, with the once-great artist sounding lost and confused. The album received mixed reviews and sold poorly, leading many to wonder if Yoakam’s best days were behind him.

5. Kinky Friedman – Kill My Coon Cat (2007)

Friedman’s second album was a messy mishmash of country, blues, and Jewish humor that failed to connect with audiences or critics. It would be Friedman’s last album for nearly a decade as he retreated from the music business in the wake of its failure.

The most controversial African-American country music songs

The most controversial African-American country music songs evoke strong reactions from both black and white audiences. These songs offer a rare glimpse into the lives of black Americans living in the rural south during the Jim Crow era. They offer a view of the world that is often at odds with the idyllic, pastoral images of country music.

The earliest examples of African-American country music date back to the early 1900s. One of the first recordings was “Darky’s Dream” by early jazz pioneer Jelly Roll Morton. Morton’s piano playing can be heard on dozens of early country recordings, including those by the Carter Family and Jimmie Rodgers.

African-American country music continued to develop in the 1920s and 1930s, with Jelly Roll Morton’s protégé Louis Jordan leading the way. Jordan was a master of both blues and swing, and his records were massive hits with black and white audiences alike. He is credited with popularizing the “country blues” sound that would later be adopted by artists like Hank Williams and Jimmie Rodgers.

During the 1940s and 1950s, several African-American country singers achieved mainstream success. The most successful was Charley Pride, who became one of the best-selling artists of all time with hits like “Kiss an Angel Good Mornin'” and “All I Have to Offer You (Is Me)”. Other successful African-American country singers of this era include Willie Nelson, Slim Whitman, and Merle Haggard.

However, not all African-American country singers were able to find success in the mainstream market. Some, like Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter and Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup, found more success in the world of folk music. Others, like Mahalia Jackson and Sister Rosetta Tharpe, found more success in gospel music. Still others, like Robert Johnson and Son House, found more success in the world of blues music.

There are many popular African-American country music songs, but the most famous is probably “The Wall Street Shuffle” by the group Leroy and the Drivers. This song was released in 1968 and became a huge hit, reaching number one on the country charts.

Country music is often considered a white man’s genre, but there have been many talented African-American country stars throughout the years. Here is a list of some of the least popular African-American country songs:

1. “Achy Breaky Heart” by Billy Ray Cyrus
2. “Boot Scootin’ Boogie” by Brooks & Dunn
3. “Daddy’s Hands” by Holly Dunn
4. “Friends in Low Places” by Garth Brooks
5. “I Wanna Dance with Somebody (Who Loves Me)” by Whitney Houston
6. “My Maria” by Brooks & Dunn
7. “Neon Moon” by Brooks & Dunn
8. “She’s in Love with the Boy” by Trisha Yearwood
9. “Strawberry Wine” by Deana Carter
10. “The Thunder Rolls” by Garth Brooks

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